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It is also helpful to show familiarity with the community where the school resides.

“You’re just being paranoid–you’re crazy for thinking like that!

Broken Landscape is a sweeping chronicle of Indian tribal sovereignty under the United States Constitution and the way that legislators have interpreted and misinterpreted tribal sovereignty since the nation's founding.

Math and science are the well-publicized shortage areas, but not the only ones.

everyone is looking for special ed,” advises Robert Piche, a veteran high school math teacher in Howard County, Maryland.

In some respects, the erosion of tribal powers reflects the legacy of an imperialist impulse to constrain or eliminate any political power that may compete with the state.

These developments have moved the nation away from its early commitments to a legally plural society--in other words, the idea that multiple nations and their legal systems could co-exist peacefully in shared territories.

While salary schedules can differ from one district to the next, many of them follow the same basic format.

Below is a chart showing the first five years of the current salary schedule for teachers in Aurora, Colorado (the location was randomly selected).

Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe), John Robinson, Jonathan Stein, Ruth Garby Torres (Schaghticoke), and David E. Originally published in 1974, just as the Wounded Knee occupation was coming to an end, Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties raises disturbing questions about the status of American Indians within the American and international political landscapes.

Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians, anthropologists, legal scholars, and political scientists, the essays cover the history of recognition, focus on recent legal and cultural processes, and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide. Analyzing the history of Indian treaty relations with the United States, Vine Deloria presents population and land ownership information to support his argument that many Indian tribes have more impressive landholdings than some small members of the United Nations.

Contributors are Joanne Barker (Lenape), Kathleen A. Yet American Indians are not even accorded status within the UN's trust territories recognition process.

Brown-Perez (Brothertown), Rosemary Cambra (Muwekma Ohlone), Amy E. A 2000 study published by the Annual Survey of International and Comparative Law recommends that the United Nations offer membership to the Iroquois, Cherokee, Navajo, and other Indian tribes.

Mississippi has routinely had more than 2,000 teaching vacancies statewide, and Florida has spent the past several years actively recruiting teachers to move to the state (see Teach in Florida to learn more).

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